How to ‘rescue’ your customer after a return.

Thunderbird’s Tracy Island in 1992, Buzz Lightyear in 1996 (and again in 2010), Tamagotchi in 1997, Furby in 1998 and Bratz Dolls in 2002 – all the ‘must-have’ toy for Christmas. For retailers and manufacturers, it is notoriously difficult to predict which toy will surge in demand in the few weeks before Christmas and they will be frantically reordering and restocking to try to maximise sales at this crucial trading time.

This year the much-hyped Christmas sensation was the “Hatchimal”, (rrp £59.99) an interactive furry bird that hatches from a plastic egg and responds to children’s affection with flashing eyes and sounds, to the delight of the recipient.

Only, in many cases, it didn’t!

Unsurprisingly many, many disappointed parents of disappointed and upset children have expressed their frustration on retailer’s website review pages and on social media. Often, having invested considerable time to track down this toy, as it became scarcer and scarcer in the run up to Christmas, they have spent an emotional Christmas Day with a child who had a less than ‘magical’ experience with their lifeless gift.

Cue ‘Dead Hatchimal Owners United’ a Facebook ‘support group’ where exasperated customers have shared their experiences to try and find a resolution. And, despite the frustration, most customers have been reasonable: –

“I know stuff happens and as long as the company takes responsibility and addresses the issue, I have no problems. I write many reviews on websites, including many social media sites…. I will say I had a problem and the company resolved the problem to my satisfaction” Facebook

However, customers are less understanding when they feel that their problem is not handled correctly. One customer in the UK expressed frustration when a retailer responded to her tweet with a website link for tips and tricks on how to get the egg to hatch. She had already explained that she had broken the egg open, so not only was this unhelpful but exposed the fact that the retailer hadn’t taken the time to read her message. Since it’s likely that they couldn’t replace the item (most retailers are currently out of stock) and could only offer a refund, perhaps an apology would have helped or maybe a discount on her next purchase.

Most customers dislike returning purchases and a return can feel like the retailer has let them down and inconvenienced them. For some customers, a refund isn’t enough –they want a personal response and they want to feel valued. If they are angry they may go to great lengths to avoid the retailer in the future.

So, what happens when the problem product isn’t a ‘must-have’ toy like ‘Hatchimal’, with a peak selling period, but one that is steadily dispatched to valuable customers who hate the inconvenience of having to return? Clear Returns predictive technology can provide retailers with a product alert ‘early warning system’. This picks up products that are returning at a higher than usual rate providing retailers with an opportunity to investigate and correct the problem before it escalates.

In addition, Clear Returns ‘Returns Rescue’ solution alerts customer service to valuable customers that are ‘at risk’ following a return, prompting a personalised ‘save’ response.

Clear Returns award winning returns intelligence platform merges key data from ecommerce, stores, and warehouse systems to target, retain and serve customers. When the information is available, it makes sense to use it.